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dc.contributor.authorSchilling, Olivia
dc.contributor.authorTejedor, Adrian
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-25T12:05:18Z
dc.date.available2018-05-25T12:05:18Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.citationActa Botánica Malacitana, Vol. 42, nº 1, 2017, págs. 141-148en_US
dc.identifier.issn0210-9506
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10630/15833
dc.description.abstractHabitat management and restoration in buffer zones of national parks is critical for maintaining ecosystem services and biological connectivity in and around the parks’ core protected areas. Vegetation succession in abandoned plantations in buffer zones may take different paths that reach climax ecosystems in more or less time depending on the conditions of initial succession, thus enhancing or hindering biological connectivity and ecosystem services. This study documents the dominance of tree ferns in the initial stages of vegetation succession on abandoned pineapple plantations on the Andean foothills around Manu National Park, Peru, and discusses the role it may have on ecosystem restoration. Four years after abandonment, tree fern gametophytes grow under the shade of pineapple plants and melastomes. After 6-10 years of succession, the vegetation is dominated by a tree fern community composed of at least eight species, of which the most common are by far Cyathea delgadii and Cyathea microdonta. Cyathea microdonta functions as a short-lived pioneer, reaching its peak of live stem density in 6 to10 years and dying off in older plots. Cyathea delgadii, on the other hand, continues to grow and persists beyond 10 years of succession. Areas adjacent to abandoned pineapple fields have few tree ferns and higher tree species diversity, suggesting that pineapple agriculture and the resulting tree fern community may be a longer pathway to reach climax vegetation stages than other types of plantation.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherUniversidad de Málaga. Servicio de Publicaciones e Intercambio Científicoen_US
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccessen_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectHelechos - Perúen_US
dc.subject.otherManu National Parken_US
dc.subject.otherAmazonen_US
dc.subject.otherPeruen_US
dc.subject.otherTree fernsen_US
dc.subject.otherVegetation successionen_US
dc.subject.otherParque Nacional del Manuen_US
dc.subject.otherAmazoniaen_US
dc.subject.otherPerúen_US
dc.subject.otherSucesión ecológicaen_US
dc.titleTree ferns dominate secondary succession in abandoned pineapple plantations around Manu National Park, Peruen_US
dc.title.alternativeLos helechos arborescentes dominan la sucesión secundaria en plantaciones de piña abandonadas alrededor del Parque Nacional del Manu, Perúen_US
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articleen_US
dc.centroFacultad de Cienciasen_US
dc.rights.ccAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 Internacional*


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