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dc.contributor.authorSampedro-Piquero, Patricia
dc.contributor.authorMoreno-Fernandez, Román D.
dc.contributor.authorMañas-Padilla, M.C.
dc.contributor.authorGil-Rodriguez, Sara
dc.contributor.authorGavito, A.L.
dc.contributor.authorCano-Pavón, José Manuel 
dc.contributor.authorPedraza-Benítez, Maria del Carmen 
dc.contributor.authorGarcía-Fernández, María 
dc.contributor.authorLadrón de Guevara-Miranda, D.
dc.contributor.authorSantín, L.J.
dc.contributor.authorCastilla-Ortega, E.
dc.date.accessioned2018-07-20T10:39:48Z
dc.date.available2018-07-20T10:39:48Z
dc.date.created2018
dc.date.issued2018-07-20
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10630/16326
dc.description.abstractLearning experiences are potent modulators of adult hippocampal neurogenesis (AHN). However, the vast majority of findings on the learning-induced regulation of AHN derive from aversively-motivated tasks, mainly the water maze paradigm, in which stress is a confounding factor that affects the AHN outcome. Currently, little is known regarding the effect of appetitively-motivated training on AHN. Hence we studied how spatial learning to find food rewards in a hole-board maze modulates AHN (cell proliferation and immature neurons) and AHN-related hippocampal neuroplasticity markers (BDNF, IGF-II and CREB phosphorylation) in mice. The 'Trained' mice were tested for both spatial reference and working memory and compared to 'Pseudotrained' mice (exposed to different baited holes in each session, thus avoiding the reference memory component of the task) and 'Control' mice (exposed to the maze without rewards). In contrast to Pseudotrained and Control mice, Trained mice reduced the number of proliferating hippocampal cells but they notably increased their population of immature neurons assessed by immunohistochemistry. This evidence shows that hole-board spatial reference learning diminishes cell proliferation in favor of enhancing young neurons' survival. Interestingly, the enhanced AHN in the Trained mice (specifically in the suprapyramidal blade) positively correlated with their reference memory performance, but not with their working memory. Furthermore, the Trained animals increased the hippocampal protein expression of all the neuroplasticity markers analyzed by western blot. Results show that the appetitively-motivated hole-board task is an useful paradigm to potentiate and/or investigate AHN and hippocampal plasticity minimizing aversive variables such as fear or stress.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipUniversidad de Málaga. Campus de Excelencia Internacional Andalucía Tech. This study was funded by grants from the Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness (Agencia Estatal de Investigación) co-funded by the European Research Development Fund -AEI/FEDER, UE- (PSI2015-73156-JIN ‘Jóvenes Investigadores grant’ to E.C.O. and PSI2013-44901-P to L.J.S. and C.P.), from ‘Junta de Andalucía’ SEJ1863 to C.P. and from University of Málaga (Plan Propio 2017 – ‘Ayudas para proyectos puente’) to M.G.F. Author P.S.P. holds a ‘Juan de la Cierva-formación‘grant from the Spanish Ministry of Economy, Industry and Competitiveness (code: FJCI-2015-23925) and a ‘D.3. Estancia de investigadores de reconocido prestigio en la UMA‘ grant from the University of Málaga. Authors R.D.M.F. and D.L.G.M. hold ‘FPU’ grants from the Spanish Ministry of Education, Culture and Sports (code: FPU14-01610 and FPU13/04819, respectively). Author F.J.P. holds a ‘Miguel Servet’ grant (code: CP14/00212) from the National System of Health-Instituto de Salud Carlos-III co-funded by FEDER, UE.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccessen_US
dc.subjectNeuroplasticidaden_US
dc.subject.otherDoublecortinen_US
dc.subject.otherStressen_US
dc.subject.otherSurvivalen_US
dc.subject.otherSpatial memoryen_US
dc.subject.otherNeuroplasticityen_US
dc.titleTraining memory without aversion: Appetitive hole-board spatial learning increases adult hippocampal neurogenesis.en_US
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/conferenceObjecten_US
dc.centroFacultad de Psicologíaen_US
dc.relation.eventtitle11th FENS Forum of Neuroscienceen_US
dc.relation.eventplaceBerlínen_US
dc.relation.eventdate7 de Julio de 2018en_US


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