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dc.contributor.authorSánchez de Pedro, Raquel
dc.contributor.authorFernández, Andrea N.
dc.contributor.authorGarcía-Sánchez, María Jesús 
dc.contributor.authorFlores-Moya, Antonio 
dc.contributor.authorBañares-España, Elena 
dc.date.accessioned2021-04-12T11:02:06Z
dc.date.available2021-04-12T11:02:06Z
dc.date.created2021
dc.date.issued2020-03-22
dc.identifier.citation12th International Phycological Congress. Abstracts book. SYM13: Ocean Global Change: acclimation and adaptation to multiple environmental drivers. p.268es_ES
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10630/21356
dc.description.abstractIn the face of ocean global change, determining critical thermal thresholds for marine organisms is a key aspect to predict the survival and persistence of populations, particularly those from rear-edge areas. Seasonal variability implies acclimation of adult individuals, which might result in shifting thermal sensitivities of their recruits. In this work, we aimed to investigate the influence of natural seasonal parental acclimation on the warming response of single- and few-celled stages of Fucus guiryi, a monoecious fucoid from the east Atlantic coast and Strait of Gibraltar, whose populations are iteroparous. To address this, we obtained embryos from fertile thalli collected in early summer, late summer, and winter. In the three replicate experiments under laboratory-controlled conditions, we followed growth, development, survival, and photosynthetic responses of embryos exposed to control (15ºC) and warming conditions (25ºC) for 3 weeks, and initial elemental composition was characterized. Our findings revealed that breeding from winter parents possessed broader thermal sensitivity and thrived better under warming conditions than those from summer specimens, where only 50% survived and experience 75% reductions in photosynthetic rates. Nevertheless, there was a significant gain in thermal resilience from early to late summer regarding survival at 25º C. This research highlighted that warmer winters would not potentially harm new recruits, while extreme temperature events in early summer might compromise the survival of the most sensitive early summer recruits, considering the RCP8.5 predictions for 2050. The influence of parental and provisioning effects and how this might be applied to ecological restoration is discussed.es_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipUniversidad de Málaga. Campus de Excelencia Internacional Andalucía Tech.es_ES
dc.language.isoenges_ES
dc.publisher12th International Phycological Congress (IPC21)es_ES
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccesses_ES
dc.subjectMares y océanos - Temperaturaes_ES
dc.subjectAlgas marinases_ES
dc.subjectCalentamiento globales_ES
dc.subject.otherOcean warminges_ES
dc.subject.otherThermal resiliencees_ES
dc.subject.otherFucoidses_ES
dc.titleHow can seasonality modulate thermal sensitivity in early stages of fucoids?: The colder, the betteres_ES
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/conferenceObjectes_ES
dc.centroFacultad de Cienciases_ES
dc.relation.eventtitle12th International Phycological Congress (IPC21)es_ES
dc.relation.eventplaceChilees_ES
dc.relation.eventdate22-26 Marzo 2021es_ES


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