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dc.contributor.authorFraga, Edmundo
dc.contributor.authorYáñez, Armando
dc.contributor.authorZea-Garcia, Jesus D.
dc.contributor.authorGomez-de-la-Torre, Maria de los Angeles 
dc.contributor.authorCuesta-Garcia, Ana Maria
dc.contributor.authorValcárcel-Fernández, Ricardo
dc.contributor.authorFarré-París, Francesc
dc.contributor.authorMalfois, Marc
dc.contributor.authorAranda, M.A.G.
dc.date.accessioned2021-04-30T09:18:53Z
dc.date.available2021-04-30T09:18:53Z
dc.date.created2020
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10630/21575
dc.description.abstractIn situ research of materials under moderate pressures (hundreds of bar) is essential in many scientific fields. These range from gas sorption to chemical and biological processes. One industrially important discipline is the hydration of oil well cements. Existing capillary cells in this pressure range are static as they are easy to design and operate. This is convenient for the study of single-phase materials; however, powder diffraction quantitative analyses for multiphase systems cannot be performed accurately as a good powder average cannot be attained. Here, the design, construction and commissioning of a cost-effective spinning capillary cell for in situ powder X-ray diffraction is reported, for pressures currently up to 200 bar. The design addresses the importance of reducing the stress on the capillary by mechanically synchronizing the applied rotation power and alignment on both sides of the capillary while allowing the displacement of the supports needed to accommodate different capillaries sizes and to insert the sample within the tube. This cell can be utilized for multiple purposes allowing the introduction of gas or liquid from both ends of the capillary. The commissioning is reported for the hydration of a commercial oil well cement at 150 bar and 150°C. The quality of the resulting powder diffraction data has allowed in situ Rietveld quantitative phase analyses for a hydrating cement containing seven crystalline phases.es_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipThe design, production and commissioning of this cell was carried out at the ALBA synchrotron as part of Edmundo Fraga’s PhD project. This work was financially supported by the Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness through Grants BIA2014-57658-C2-1-R and BIA2017-82391-R which are co-funded by FEDER. We are grateful to Prof. Angus Wilkinson, Georgia Institute of Technology Atlanta, for sharing his knowledge and details on the high pressure cell developed by his team. We also thank Dr. Marcus Paul, Dyckerhoff-Lengerich, Germany, for fruitful discussion on Oil Well Cements. The cell was commissioned at BL11-NCD-SWEET beamline.es_ES
dc.language.isoenges_ES
dc.relation.ispartofseries26;1238-1244
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccesses_ES
dc.subjectMateriales a altas presioneses_ES
dc.subjectResistencia de materialeses_ES
dc.subjectPozos petrolíferos - Materialeses_ES
dc.subjectCementoes_ES
dc.subject.otherHigh-pressure equipmentes_ES
dc.subject.otherOil well cementes_ES
dc.subject.otherCement hydrationes_ES
dc.subject.otherRietveld quantitative phase analysises_ES
dc.titleHigh pressure and temperature spinning capillary cell for in-situ synchrotron X-ray powder diffractiones_ES
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articlees_ES
dc.centroFacultad de Cienciases_ES
dc.identifier.doi10.1107/S1600577519005150
dc.type.hasVersioninfo:eu-repo/semantics/acceptedVersiones_ES


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