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dc.contributor.authorInfantes-López, M. Inmaculada
dc.contributor.authorZambrana-Infantes, Emma
dc.contributor.authorChaves-Peña, Patricia
dc.contributor.authorNieto-Quero, Andrea
dc.contributor.authorMuñoz-Martín, José
dc.contributor.authorPedraza-Benítez, Maria del Carmen 
dc.contributor.authorPérez-Martín, Margarita 
dc.date.accessioned2022-07-26T10:32:34Z
dc.date.available2022-07-26T10:32:34Z
dc.date.issued2022-07
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10630/24784
dc.description.abstractStress is the main environmental cause for depression, known to cause brain immune alterations. As major brain immune cells, microglia undergo transcriptional and, consequently, morphological changes that result in tissue damage, including new cell generation impairment. Even so, few brain regions have been thoroughly studied, excluding key regulators as the hypothalamus, in which this process remains partially unknown. Moreover, there is a poor understanding in physiology related to behavioral outcome. Therefore, it would be interesting to study the relationship between microglia and cell proliferation in stressed mice while controlling for behavior. Here, we used the social defeat stress (SDS) paradigm as a depression-inducing protocol in 8-week-old male C57BL/6J mice for 10 consecutive days. Intruder mice behavior was analyzed to assess depression using behavioral tests and K-means clustering. By immunohistochemical and imaging procedures, microglial morphology, and distribution, as well as cell survival, were analyzed in the hypothalamic paraventricular, ventromedial and arcuate nucleus. Finally, statistical mediation analysis was conducted to evaluate the relationship among variables. Results show mice response to SDS was different, being half the mice resilient and half sensitive to depressive-like symptoms. Microglial morphological activation was enhanced in the ventromedial and arcuate nucleus, especially in stress sensitive animals. Similar results were observed in cell survival, which was particularly affected in sensitive mice. Strikingly, these cell survival changes were statistically mediated by microglial activation. As a conclusion, hypothalamic regions were found to respond differently to stress, accordingly to behavioral outcome, in terms of microglial activation and subsequent decrease in cell survival.es_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipThis study was supported by FEDER/Ministerio de Ciencia, Innovación y Universidades – Agencia Estatal de Investigación from Spain (PSI2017-83408-P to Pedraza C.), FEDER/Junta de Andalucía from Spain (UMA20-FEDERJA-112 to Pedraza C. and Pérez- Martín M), and Ministerio de Educación, Cultura y Deporte from Spain (FPU19/03629 to Infantes-López MI and FPU16/05308 to Nieto-Quero A). Universidad de Málaga. Campus de Excelencia Internacional Andalucía Tech.es_ES
dc.language.isoenges_ES
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccesses_ES
dc.subjectEstrés (Fisiología) - Congresoses_ES
dc.subjectDepresión mental - Efectos del estrés - Congresoses_ES
dc.subjectExperimentación animal - Congresoses_ES
dc.subjectMicroglia - Efectos del estrés - Congresoses_ES
dc.subject.otherMicrogliaes_ES
dc.subject.otherHypothalamuses_ES
dc.subject.otherMicees_ES
dc.subject.otherCell survivales_ES
dc.titleSocial defeat stress induces microglial alterations and impaired cell survival in the hypothalamus according to behavioral phenotypees_ES
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/conferenceObjectes_ES
dc.centroFacultad de Cienciases_ES
dc.relation.eventtitleFENS FORUM 2022es_ES
dc.relation.eventplacePARIS, FRANCIAes_ES
dc.relation.eventdate9-13 SEPTIEMBRE 2022es_ES


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