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dc.contributor.authorGordillo, Francisco J.L.
dc.date.accessioned2014-04-08T11:15:53Z
dc.date.available2014-04-08T11:15:53Z
dc.date.created2014-03-10
dc.date.issued2014-04-08
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10630/7393
dc.descriptionArchivo en PDF de la presentación realizada en el citado congresoes_ES
dc.description.abstractInteractive effects of ocean acidification and elevated temperature on seaweed physiology Francisco J. L. Gordillo Departamento de Ecologia, Universidad de Malaga, Spain Seaweeds are the major primary producers of the Arctic coastal ecosystems. A significant part of the food web, both aquatic and terrestrial depend on the biomass production of these organisms. Temperature is a well known abiotic factor determining biogeographic distribution of seaweeds, but little is known on how the increase in CO₂ may modify the response of seaweeds to increased temperature. Our group aims to elucidate the mecanisms involved in the acclimation to the new environmental scenario the seaweeds are facing. Metabolic processes such as inorganic carbon utilisation have been revealed as acting in a different way in Arctic seaweeds than in their cold-temperate counterparts. In non-polar species, one of the major enzymes involved in inorganic carbon acquisition, the external carbonic anhydrase (eCA) is known to be repressed under high CO₂. However, Arctic seaweeds show high values of eCA activity and seem to be little affected by CO₂, so that eCA might have evolutively changed as part of the adaptation to low temperature. Other processes involved in the carbon balance of the organisms are photosynthesis and organic carbon release to the external medium. The release of organic carbon acts as a regulatory mechanism for internal C:N balance, so that differences in inorganic carbon utilisation (acquisition and photosynthesis) may lead to a different proportion of primary production lost as organic C. As a consequence, the acclimation of seaweeds to changing CO₂ and temperature would change the C balance of the thalli, so affecting the biogeochemical cycle of C. These responses are highly species-specific, with species taking advantage of the new scenario and others suffering an adverse effect. Changes in both the C balance and species dominance/composition may propagate to other trophic levels, potentially changing the whole ecosystem.es_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipUniversidad de Málaga. Campus de Excelencia Internacional Andalucía Teches_ES
dc.language.isoenges_ES
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
dc.subjectAlgas - Fisiologíaes_ES
dc.subject.otherArctices_ES
dc.subject.otherCO2es_ES
dc.subject.otherSeaweedes_ES
dc.subject.otherGlobal changees_ES
dc.titleInteractive effects of ocean acidification and elevated temperature on seaweed physiologyes_ES
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/otheres_ES
dc.centroFacultad de Cienciases_ES
dc.relation.eventtitleKongsfjorden Ecosystem Workshopes_ES
dc.relation.eventplaceSenja, Noruegaes_ES
dc.relation.eventdate10 al 17 Marzo, 2014es_ES


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